April 9, 2010

On Oreo Cheesecake truffles.

Posted in Baking, Bite-Sized, No-Bake, Recipe tagged , , , , , , at 10:39 pm by Dani

On, around, near, and ALL OVER these gosh darn truffles. I have a serious food crush on these things.

It’s another recipe inspired by Recipe Rhapsody. I’m not sure if she got it from somewhere else or if she invented it herself. All I have to say is that if she imagined these up herself, she sure deserves an award. They’re DELICIOUS.

I found this recipe while browsing her archives, and immediately knew I had something magical in front of me. First of all, I can’t resist a bite-sized anything. If you’ve been reading regularly, you probably know that already. Secondly, while I’m not a big fan of eating oreo cookies plain, oreos are a dessert-lover’s dream.

oreos

Oreo flavored things are delicous. Actually, delicious doesn’t cover it. Have you ever seen the commercials for Philadelphia Cream cheese circa 2007? You know, where they’re all in heaven? That’s how putting oreos in my dessert makes me feel.

You got philly in my oreo! You got oreo in my philly! Mmmmmmm.

The only changes I made to the recipe she gave was to add 1/2 cup confectioner’s sugar, and to call them “Oreo Cheescake Truffles”, as opposed to simply “Oreo Truffles”.

I added the sugar because when I whipped up the batter without it, I couldn’t appreciate the truffles as a new creation. By that I mean that when combining ingredients to make something new, I want the product to stand on its own as a brand new creation; better than the sum of its parts. The recipe without the sugar felt like eating oreo and cream cheese rather than an Oreo Cheesecake truffle. Adding the confectioner’s sugar changed it all. Suddenly I was eating a little bite of cheesecake, and it was wonderful. A love affair was born.

Fine. You guys can make it too. I’ll try not to get jealous.

oreo cheesecake truffles

We'll talk about those pink ones later this week. The Oreo Cheesecake Truffles are the brown ones.

1 package (1 lb. 2 oz) Oreo cookies

1 package (8 oz) cream cheese, softened

1/2 cup confectioner’s sugar

Chocolate for coating. We’ll talk about this later.*

1. Pour cookies into your food processor. Veronica at Recipe Rhapsody warned that if you use all the cookies, you’ll end up with about 1 cup too much. I don’t mind that so much since I just kept the extra in a plastic bag for later. I’m always looking for things that are more interesting than sprinkles. If you’re bothered by the prospect of leftover crushed oreo, then set about 8-10 aside and eat them later. Run food processor until oreos are ground very fine.

2. Pour 3 cups ground oreo into a mixing bowl, and add in softened cream cheese and confectioner’s sugar. Mix with you hands. This will get messy–get over it. Use gloves if you can’t handle it.

3. Coat. Sprinkle leftover ground oreo over truffles.

4. Enjoy.

5. Enjoy again.

6. Stop. Control yourself.

7. Okay, just one more.

Sigh. These are seriously amazing.

*Its later. Lets talk about coating. A few days ago I wrote about coating using real chocolate. I said that I didn’t know what chocolate candy coating was, and didn’t find it necessary. Well, kids, this time I tried using chocolate candy coating. I bought dark cocoa Wilton Candy Melts® at my nearest craft store to see what would happen.

Here’s what I learned. Candy Melts® do indeed melt better. They stay melted well in bowls with any specific heat. They don’t harden too quickly, which is great because you don’t have to keep nuking your chocolate, but also makes it near impossible to roll the chocolates around in sprinkles or whatever topping you’re using. If you want a topping on the chocolate and you’re using candy coating, you must sprinkle them over the truffles, not roll the truffles in them.

I also learned that candy coating doesn’t taste as good as real chocolate. It might have been this brand. Most recipes call for something called “bark candy coating,” but I couldn’t find it anywhere. It may very well taste better. If you have it, go ahead and taste it. It might be tasty.

However, if your coating chocolate doesn’t taste great you’re going to have to ask yourself: what is more important; ease or quality? Normally, I’d say try to find somewhere in the middle, but this is an either/or kind of situation. So what will I do? I’ll be using real chocolate. My kitchen is the only place in my life where I happily work extra hard to make something better. That being said, it is good to know that this other chocolate stuff exists for times when I’m really rushing.

Last thing I want to share: I used my normal method with this new chocolate: roll truffle around in chocolate using two forks, and then place truffle only one fork and let most of the excess drip off.

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April 2, 2010

On my favorite Passover dessert.

Posted in Baking, Bite-Sized, Holidays, No-Bake, Recipe tagged , , , , at 10:47 pm by Dani

Actually, it’s my favorite desert ever. It’s from an Israeli cookbook, and yes folks; I’m going to translate the recipe for you. You should know that this is a big deal, since though I’m a native hebrew speaker, I can barely read the language.

So here it is, with a couple of my ammendments, and know this took me forever to read out of the book, but I do it for you:

chocoalte log completed

This is a picture-phone photo of the photo in the book. I swear, one day I'll get a real camera.

Chocolate Log:

8 matzahs

1 cup sweet wine (aka Manaschewitz)

200 grams unsweetened chocolate (just over 7 oz)

1/2 cup milk

2 tbsp cocoa powder

1 cup sugar

1 tsp instant coffee

1/2 cup margarine (or butter, but the recipe calls for margerine), room temp

3 tbsp brandy (or orange liqueur, but I highly recommend using brandy)

You’ll also need aluminum foil.

1. Crumble matzah in a medium sized bowl. Pour wine in.

2. On low heat, melt the chocolate, milk, cocoa powder, sugar, and coffee. Remove from heat and immediately add margarine and brandy. Stir until margarine melts completely.

3. Remove wine from matzah, gently squeezing out the excess. Gently, people, but still effectively. You don’t want a watery product, nor do you want to crush the matzah too small.

4. Add chocolate mixture, and stir to combine. Be sure to coat all the matzah.

5. Separate the mixture into two equal parts. Grease 2 sheets of foil, about 18″ long each. Pour mixture onto foil in a strip, and roll it up in the foil. The cookbook says to refrigerate overnight, but I always stick it in the freezer instead. That way when you serve it, it won’t get all messy and gross by the time people get to it.

This is what it should look like going into the fridge/freezer

6. When ready to serve, remove from foil and slice into pieces about 1/2″ thick. Put each piece into a cupcake baking cup.